Media and Communications

Courses

ART 236: Digital Photography I

Credits 4

This introductory course explores technical aspects of digital photography. Utilizing Photoshop, digital SLR cameras and apps, technical topics cover digital capture, image editing, and digital output. Students become familiar with historic and contemporary photography. Critiques are the central forum for students to develop their ability to speak about their own work and that of their peers. DSLR and (not zoom) lens- limited numbers are available- or manual camera apps are required.

BUS 368: Business Communication

Credits 3

This skills-based business communication course equips students to effectively make oral presentations alone and in teams, lead meetings, and write for a business audience. Students will learn how to create a sensory experience in their oral presentations, while clearly presenting information, facts and data. Students will practice writing concise summary reports and adopt acceptable business conventions for various correspondence mediums. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

CS 355: Computer Game Design

Credits 3

This course covers a variety of software engineering and user experience topics through the lens of game design. Students construct several games over the course of the term, first individually and then collaboratively, putting theory into practice.

ENG 221: Intro to Creative Writing

Credits 4

An introduction to creative writing and the writing workshop process, focusing on the genres of poetry and short fiction but also occasionally exploring other genres (such as playwriting or creative non-fiction). Includes intensive writing and discussion of the craft and process of writing. Appropriate for first-year students.

FILM 215: Introduction to Film Studies

Credits 3

Introduces film analysis skills that focus on technical details of the cinematic medium, and how they influence narration, character and theme. Highlights important topics in film history and film theory. Offered once every three years.

FILM 222: Greece and Rome in Film

Credits 4

Did you know that Disney's Beauty and the Beast is based on a Latin novel written almost 2,000 years ago? Or that Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club bears a striking resemblance to Sophocles' Oedipus Rex? Each week, students will read a selection of ancient literature and pair it with a screening of modern film to assess the continued influence that ancient narratives still exert across multiple genres.

FILM 252: Film Theory: Dark Matters

Credits 4

Investigates the relationship between philosophical ideas and visual narratives. Examines the philosophical foundations of various theories of film and interprets visual narratives in terms of philosophical ideas. Prerequisite: Earlham Seminar.

FILM 299: Religion & Culture of Hip Hop

Credits 4

Bringing to bear written texts, music, film and other media sources, this course explores the definition and moral significance of Hip Hop as a religious and cultural phenomenon within popular culture. Specific issues explored in this course include the syncretism of religious symbols and sensibilities in Hip Hop; the racial, ethnic, sex-gendered, and class dynamics of Hip Hop; as well as the language and aesthetics of Hip Hop.

FILM 300: Topics in film studies

Credits 3 4

Topics determined by the instructor might consider particular filmmakers or cinematic movements and interdisciplinary or thematic concerns. It may be taken more than once with different topics.

FILM 342: Japanese Cinema

Credits 3

A survey of Japanese cinema from early films to anime, comparing the development of Japanese cinema with other national contexts. Develops analytical skills that focus on technical details of films and how they inflect narration, character and theme.

FILM 472: Orchestrating & Film Scoring

Credits 3

This course combines traditional approaches to composing and arranging for the Western symphony orchestra with a software-based approach using MIDI and sampled acoustic instruments. Both approaches will be taught in conjunction with analyses of classic and contemporary film scoring techniques. Projects can be realized using either traditional music notation or the MIDI system. Final project will include the scoring of an original short video or a video in public domain.

MCOM 120: Intro to Media and Communication

Credits 4
Introduction to Media and Communication examines forms of social connectivity the supplement, replace and enhance face to face communication. The course will ask how long standing understanding of society and social life have been transformed by what some have called the digital revolution. Among the topics covered will be: data marketing, social movements, love and romance, government, and surveillance in the global world. Throughout the class a key question raised will be the consequences of being left in or out of the digital revolution for people's lives.

MCOM 240: Science, Medicine, and Media

Credits 4
How has evolution molded human biological evolution and cultural diversity? What are the broader implications of our evolutionary history? This class seeks answers to these enduring questions. Divided into four parts, we begin by examining Darwin's ideas about natural selection and the challenges his ideas have faced over the past 150 years. The second section examines how evolution has shaped the anatomy and behavior of our closest living relatives, non-human primates. The third part of the class is devoted to investigating the human fossil record and tracing the physical and behavioral evolution of our species over the past five million years. In the fourth section, we focus on the breadth of human variation and explore the broader social implications of our evolved behavior.

MCOM 275: Video Production

Credits 3
Video Production will create foundational skills and techniques with video equipment in both field and studio environments. This course will cover the basic utilization of post-production software to produce content. Through hands on experience students will grow their aesthetic understanding as it applies to filming and editing. During the semester students will complete a variety of individual and group projects, which may include documentary, experimental, fiction, commercial, and music video production.

MCOM 290: Public Speaking

Credits 4

Many people are filled with anxiety when even thinking about public speaking. This fear stems from the fact that communication in general, and public speaking specifically, is not something that most people naturally know how to do effectively. Introduction to Public Speaking provides students with a supportive, interactive environment in which to learn fundamental communication theory and to put theory into practice through a variety of formal and informal speaking opportunities. Each student will leave this course feeling more confident in his/her ability as a communicator and better equipped to create and present an effective oral message.

MCOM 309: Sociology of Social Media

Credits 3

This course will introduce students to debates about the nature and effects of social media. How do online and offline worlds relate? What are the social consequences of new communications technologies? Students will learn the theories and methods that sociologists use to study online social interaction.

MCOM 310: Media & Surveillance in Contemporary

Credits 3

Examining the intersection of recent digital technologies and an intensifying social gaze on individuals, populations, spaces and activities, this seminar focuses on behavior as monitored. The course considers how surveillance practices serve as instruments of social political discipline, market competition, knowledge circulation, risk reduction, social sorting and resource management, as well as fostering new forms of social participation and individual expression.

MCOM 324: Anthropology of Sound

Credits 4
Much of human life is arranged around sounds and silences. Practices of listening, capacities for hearing and interpreting sound can define who we are. This course examines how anthropologists have thought about sound. Coursework is divided between readings, media content, and a project to create a podcast episode.

MCOM 345: Social Research Methods

Credits 4
Introduces micro-social qualitative and focus group approaches in social research, preparing students to carry out original research projects in other Sociology/Anthropology courses.

MUS 371: Music Theory and Musicianship IIl: Composition, Analysis, and Ear Training

Credits 4

This course builds on the foundations of Music Theory II. Here, we study more advanced musical concepts through score analysis and the composition of short musical exercises. Emphasis is on the techniques found in 20th and 21st century musics, including late Chromaticism, Impressionism, Mixed-Mode techniques, Post-tonal approaches, Minimalism, and the current trend towards hybrid compositions that embrace both the club and the concert hall.

MUS 473: Sound Design and Interactive Systems

Credits 3

This course focuses on developing multimedia software for music performance, human-machine interaction, and game design through the use of the object-oriented programming language "Max." After a thorough investigation of Max's approach to programming, students will study its use in a wide variety of new music and multimedia applications. Students will work towards a completed project in Max and, if interested, in its related programs Jitter (for video) and Gen (for algorithmic composition). This course also will explore the close relationship between Max and Ableton Live.

SOAN 215: Identities & Social Movements

Credits 4

Explores contemporary social movements organized around gender, sexuality, ethnicity and place. Examines the pivotal role of culture in shaping identities and structuring relations of inequality. Explores empirical case studies of social movements and theories that have emerged to grapple with the place of these movements in creating social change. Particular attention to tensions between class-based analyses of social movements.

SOAN 345: Social Research Methods

Credits 4

Primarily for Sociology/Anthropology majors. Introduces micro-social qualitative and focus group approaches in social research, preparing students to carry out original research projects in other Sociology/Anthropology courses.

SOAN 347: Fieldwork & Ethnographic Methods

Credits 4

A self-designed ethnographic research project is carried out during the semester, with the members of the Practicum consulting with the group about their projects. Completes one of the options for the departmental methods requirement.